Tag Archives: FEAP 4B

Week 12 – Mathematics – 2D Shapes

Lesson Plan for Observation on 4.9.15

I have continued to take the lead on teaching all subject areas in my classroom, which has been such a wonderful experience. I can clearly tell that I am making growth with my teaching. My collaborating teacher commented that my flow has definitely improved. I am just so excited to be able to practice. In the previous week, I had used a timer to help me stay on track and once I got a feel for the time, I was able to stop using it because I was more familiar with the timing of my lessons.

I planned a special mathematics lesson about decomposing 2D shapes in which I designed all but one of the worksheets. I was really proud of this lesson because it was a real observation to evaluate my teaching and I believe I did a good job. I introduced the lesson by engaging the students with a mathematics game. Then I did some explicit modeling for the students.

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Once I collected enough anecdotal data through a quick check and observations, I made groups based on ability levels and gave the students worksheets that I created. I pulled a small group to provide extra support. Then I called the students back together to complete an exit ticket and for the closure of the lesson I had the students answer the essential question. I really liked the lesson because I gave the students the opportunity to explore the 2D shapes with lots of hands on experiences and movement. One aspect of the lesson that I would have liked to work on would be to give the students a bit more time for the exit ticket but I wanted to make sure that there was enough time for the closure.

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One thing that I really like about creating my own worksheets is that I can make them to meet the needs of my students. For example, on the worksheets there are four small shapes: a triangle, a rhombus, a trapezoid, and a hexagon. The original worksheets that I found (see the first worksheet) had the students simply draw lines to show how they decomposed the shapes but after watching my students during other lessons, I noticed that my students had a lot of trouble with this. I think this may be related to difficulties with fine and gross motor skills but also because it is difficult to record the information even though students can explain it verbally. So I provided my students with the opportunity to circle the shapes they used in order to show me what they did so I could gain a better understanding of whether or not my students grasped the concept. On the actual worksheets, I colored in each of these shapes so the students can choose what shapes they used because they resemble the pattern blocks that they used just in case the students could not tell what the shapes were since I hand drew them. All in all, I really liked my lesson and I am glad that I was able to teach all of the previous lessons so I had enough anecdotal data and observations to make these key decisions to help my students be successful.

Another aspect of my classroom that I am extremely excited about is the amount of exploration elements in the room related to our science content. We have multiple plants growing inside and outside of the classroom. For our Long Term Investigation (LTI) the students are analyzing the changes and growth of catnip grass plants inside and outside, then we are also trying to grow lima beans and two potatoes. We are also raising meal worm beetles and we just received a shipment of pill bugs that we will be introducing shortly. The final, most exciting, element in my classroom right now is monarch butterfly caterpillars.

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The students are extremely excited about the caterpillars. They check them every day in the morning to see their growth and to see how much of the plant has been eaten. I was very happy to see one student doing research on caterpillars when she was in the classroom library so we put the book (as seen in the above picture) next to the caterpillars so they students can learn about the caterpillars as well. One of the best parts about this is that the students are so engaged that they want to share the butterfly garden with everyone that enters the room, including the principal.

I have had so many wonderful experiences in my classroom which I am extremely thankful for. I am so happy that my collaborating teacher has provided me with a lot of support so I can do things such as providing students with all of these exciting parts of the classroom to explore.

Week 11 – Mathematics Content Coaching – Observation 2D Shapes

Lesson Plan: Mathematics – Week 1 – 2D Shapes 

I taught a mathematics lesson about the defining attributes of 2D shapes on Wednesday of the previous week. For this lesson, I met FEAP 1A by aligning my lesson with the standard: “MAFS.1.G.1.1 – Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sides) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.” By the end of the lesson, my students had to be able to answer thee essential question: “What attributes can you use to define 2D shapes?”

When I was younger, I built 2D and 3D shapes using toothpicks and marshmallows and I wanted to incorporate that fun and engaging activity into my lesson to keep the students interested. I made sure to discuss the importance of using the items as math manipulatives. My collaborating teacher and the math content coach both agreed that the students were able to use the tools well and there were few, if any, distractions or students who misused (or ate) the tools. I first asked the students to make a rectangle and then I had a few students build rectangles under the document camera. My content coach offered a great suggestion to decrease the amount of time spent waiting for students to build these shapes; she said I should have the students build the shapes on dry erase boards and then have them lift the board and bring it to the front to share.

I had the students build a few other 2D shapes and then I challenged them to build a circle using the toothpicks and marshmallows. Immediately the students were very vocal, telling me that they could not make a circle. I challenged them and told them to try, which unfortunately actually brought one student to tears when we became frustrated. I wanted my students to fully understand that a circle is made up of curved lines, no straight lines, which is why it has no flat sides or vertices and cannot be considered a polygon. I then gave the students a pipe cleaner, which they were able to easily form into a circle. I was a bit shocked that a student actually started to cry from frustrated but I definitely wanted to challenge my students and have them think critically about the shape. One student actually made a circle with marshmallows, which was great thinking but technically not aligned with the question. But I had her share what she did because I think it is so important for students to think outside of the box.

The students then completed differentiated worksheets independently and then they completed an exit ticket, which they helped design the rubric for. They had to answer the essential question, “What attributes can you use to define a 2D shape?”

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I really love this rubric system and have used it many times in the classroom. Purple is the “highest” score one can receive, next green, then orange, and yellow is the bottom color. The students aim to get a purple score, but a green is still a good score. The students led the creation of this rubric.

In mathematics, we have our students explain their thinking using a “5 Star Sentence.” Which is a sentence with a capital letter at the beginning, correct punctuation, correctly spelled sight words, and if a student does not know how to spell a word, he or she underlines the word. The students also needed to make a drawing/model of a 2D shape and label the shape with the attributes. The students decided not to put a specific number for the amount of labels for purple, which I liked because it gave them the opportunity to talk about all different kinds of defining attributes, instead of just sides and vertices.

One interesting part that the students wanted to add was the phrase “Don’t try” to the yellow part of the rubric. I have noticed that sometimes the students want to add this to the rubric. I think that on almost all occasions, students want to try and be successful in the classroom; however, my collaborating teacher and I have made it very clear to the students that they can receive assistance if necessary and that it is better to ask for help instead of not trying. I feel like this word choice was very interesting and it shows that they really want to show what they know and believe it is important to always try their best.

After the students turned in their exit tickets, the math content coach had them discussed what they learned in relation to the essential question. She recorded their responses on the board to see if my class had a good understanding of the content and were able to answer the essential question.

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After the recorded their answers she asked them to tell her what the attributes are of a 2D shape, which she labeled with a box (which one student pointed out is the shape of a rectangle). I was very, very pleased with their answers and I really felt like this discussion showed that my students clearly understood the content from my lesson.

I was really excited that my math lesson turned out well. I will continue to be a part of mathematics content coaching, although I may not receive another full observation cycle but the content coach may come in to observe me. I am excited for the end of the year but I still have a lot to do during these last few weeks. I have been granted the wonderful opportunity to take the lead on teaching all content areas for over two weeks (excluding testing week), which I hope will continue so I can gain more and more experience to help me improve my teaching.

Mathematics Lesson Plan – Basic Facts to Twenty Reflection

Math – Week 1 – Lesson Plan – Adding And Subtracting Within Twenty

Nicole L Pre Observation Coaching Lesson Document (PPQT) 11.17.14

Math – Week 1 – Lesson Plan Draft 2 – Adding And Subtracting Within Twenty

Math – Week 1 – Pose Purposeful Questions Reflection Tool

The mathematics content coaching cycle was a bit different than the previous content coaching cycles. For this cycle, the mathematics coach will focus on three or four residents each week. I designed and implemented my lesson plan for mathematics in the first week. The mathematics coach wants to make sure that she gives everyone ample time to perform a pre-conference, observation, and post-conference so it was decided that each resident would receive specific coaching for one week. I will continue to work with my collaborating teacher to co-plan and co-teach mathematics during the semester but at this point in time, I will not participate in the content coaching observation cycle for the remainder of the semester.

Before my mathematics lesson, I met with the mathematics content coach to discuss my five page lesson plan and how I would pose purposeful questions. We talked through some of the elements of the five page lesson plan such as the goals, possible misconceptions, and prior knowledge but the main focus was on question types. It is important for me to not only use and create higher order thinking (HOT) questions but to pose questions of various types to elicit student thinking. There are four types of questions that we analyzed: gathering information, probing thinking, making mathematics visible, and encouraging reflection and justification. I believe that it is important to focus on these questions so that I do not only ask questions on the lower levels of Bloom’s taxonomy. By working with the mathematics coach on my questioning, I met FEAP 3F – “Employ higher-order questioning techniques.” We worked together to create questions for each framework and I determined how I would use them in my lesson.

After our discussion, I revised my lesson plan to change some of the questions, add new questions, and charge the order of some questions in my lesson. The majority of my lesson plan was the same. I aligned my lesson with the standards MAFS.1.OA.1.1
“Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem” and MAFS.1.OA.3.6 – “Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten,; decomposing a number leading to a ten; using the relationship between addition and subtraction; and creating equivalent but easier or known sums by creating the known equation.” This allowed me to meet FEAP 1A –  “Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor.”

For this lesson, I designed my own groups based on previous data that I collected through anecdotal notes and observations. This allowed me to meet FEAP 3H – “Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students.” There were a few students that I believed would need additional support for the lesson. I collected data through observations and used this to inform my instruction by pulling a small group as the other students worked in pairs. I designed the assessments based on the abilities of my students to match their learning needs. This allowed me to meet FEAP 4B – Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead to mastery as well as FEAP 4D – “Modifies assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels of knowledge.”

When I implemented the lesson, I modified it in order to meet the needs of my students and address their misconceptions, which allowed me to meet FEAP 3D – “Modify instruction to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions.” I asked the students to show me two ways to make ten. We listed these methods on the board and I asked them if there were other ways to make ten. After we had about five methods (all addition) on the board, I asked how many ways we can make ten. Not surprisingly, my students counted the methods on the board. I decided to take the time to show my students there are many ways to make ten using addition of two and three addends as well as subtraction. I tried to grant the students the opportunity to list ways to make ten without explicitly mentioning using three addends or subtraction. After some gentle pushes, the students grasped the concept and realized that there are a lot of ways to make ten.

I wanted to highlight this point because I want my students to become familiar with the various basic facts within twenty. My students have been working on balancing equations on each sides of the number line and finding equations that are equal. This lesson connected to these previous lessons by showing students there are multiple number sentences that equal ten or any other number. By doing this, I met FEAP 1B – “Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge.”

After my lesson, I watched the recording and took notes about my questioning strategies and the types of questions that I asked. One important aspect of my teaching that I noticed is that the majority of my questions were unplanned. This is important to know so I can focus on planning more questions ahead of time. This could also show how I respond to my students. I noticed that I repeated some questions a lot such as “are there more ways to make ten?” I did this because I wanted to probe my students’ thinking without explicitly telling them to use subtraction or three addends to find a number. In the end, they needed some guidance to understand this concept but I assumed this would occur. My students typically have more success with addition as compared to subtraction. I assumed that my students would easily see the addition facts and need some help finding subtraction facts, which is what occurred. This shows me that my collaborating teacher and I should provide extra support in the area of subtraction and provide our students with many opportunities to practice subtraction. This allows me to meet FEAP 4A – “Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students’ learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process.”

As always, I am excited to continue taking the lead on planning and teaching various subjects in the classroom. I hope to continue co-teaching mathematics with my collaborating teacher and taking the lead on lessons to increase my comfort level with mathematics and gain more experience. I am excited to continue focusing on mathematics in the upcoming weeks even if I do not participate in formal observations and conferences.

Reading Lesson Plan – Shared Reading – Visualization and Inferences

Reading Content Coaching – Week 3 – Shared Reading – Visualization and Inferences

 

The past week was the final week of English Language Arts (ELA) content coaching. I am glad for the experience with performing shared reading because I have never attempted to teach this type of lesson by myself before. I hope to continue working with my collaborating teacher in ELA. Next week, I will begin the mathematics content coaching cycle. My first lesson will be about fluently adding numbers within 20. I cannot believe how quickly this semester has gone by! The following week, November 24-28th, is Thanksgiving Break and I will not be working in my internship at all due to the holiday and closing of schools.

 

For the shared reading lesson, I met the standard LAFS.1.FI.3.7: Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas, which allowed me to meet FEAP 1A: “Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor.” This lesson connected to my previous shared reading lesson in which the students used their senses to help them visualize the content of poems. I sequenced my lessons in this way in order to have my students continue to build upon the skill of visualization as well as fostering comprehension. This allowed me to meet FEAP 1B: “Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge.” For this lesson, I used The Primary Comprehension Toolkit Book 4 – Infer and Visualize to help me design and plan my lesson. I really appreciated having this reference material, which was provided by Hillsborough county as part of the Journeys curriculum. The book that I used during this lesson was Antarctica by Helen Cowcher.

In the beginning of the lesson, I engaged the students by having them visualize being in Antarctica through a verbal description of the location: ““We’re going to take a long trip today! Close your eyes for a minute and imagine a very, very cold place. The wind is whistling and almost knocking you over. The snow is swirling around you, hitting your face, stinging it, and it’s difficult to see. You are standing on crunchy sow, and in the distance you can see giant icebergs floating in the ocean. Think about what it would be like to live in such a place!” Then I asked the students to describe what they visualized, and felt when they thought about standing on the ice and snow. I made sure to make explicit connections between the cold weather and the cold that they visualized in the story. I was surprised that some students immediately made a connection to Antarctica. I showed the students Antarctica on the globe to give them some perspective and help them understand a little bit about the continent. This engage activity allowed me to meet FEAP 3E “Relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences.”

Before I read the book, I introduced making inferences to the students. My students have already learning about making inferences in science so I simply had to re-familiarize them with the concept. I used an “equation” to help them remember how to make an inference and I referred back to it throughout the lesson. This inference equation is based on one found in The Primary Comprehension Toolkit Book 4 – Infer and Visualize.

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As I read the book, the students and I made inferences on just about each page of the book. I wrote these inferences on an anchor chart that I made. This chart had two columns: “I Learned …” and “I Inferred.” I used this t-chart because I was able to explicitly show the students the text clues that I used to help me make an inference. I was very surprised during my lesson that the students were able to come up with many inferences, including when they worked independently. One weakness; however, that I noted was that many students did not refer back to the text to talk about what they learned. This was; however, the first day of the lesson so it is understandable that the students need more help. My formative assessment of having students write inferences about one page describing what they learned and inferred informed me that I needed to reteach picking out what I learned from the text that helped me make an inference. I believe that this formative assessment allowed me to meet FEAP 1D: “Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning” as well as FEAP 3C: “Identify gaps in students’ subject matter knowledge” and FEAP 4B: “Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead to mastery.” I was unable to teach the second day because I was in my college courses but I would have focused on this skill if I had the opportunity to do so. By reflecting on the lesson, I meet FEAP 3D and FEAP 3J by understanding how I would “modify instruction to respond to misconceptions” by “utilizing student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction.”

All in all, I am very grateful for the opportunity to teach multiple shared reading lessons. I hope to continue taking the lead in ELA so I can learn and grow as a future educator. Next week will begin the next three week content coaching cycle, which is for mathematics.

Reading Lesson Plan – Shared Reading – Poetry

Reading – Week 2 – Lesson Plan – Shared Reading – Poems

Reading – Week 2 – Poems

For this week, I co-planned a shared reading lesson with the reading content coach to meet the standard LAFS.1.RL.2.4 – Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. By doing this, I met FEAP 1A: “aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor.” I really appreciated the insight of the reading content coach. He gave me ideas of differentiation for the lesson to meet the needs of all of my students. In the end, we decided on a guided release process that reflected “I do, we do, you do.” In the beginning of the lesson, the class and I read through a poem called “Happiness” to explicitly explain and show the students how the author helps us visualize the poem through the senses.

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I really liked this poem because it explicitly mentions the senses, which really helps the students picture the poem. We read the poem line by line and pictured each part. Then the students came up with their own titles for the poem such as “Happiness” or “Having Fun.”

After this discussion, we read “Quack! Quack!” by Dr. Seuss which connected with the other lessons of the week because we were studying Dr. Seuss. The students had their own copies of the poem in their Journey’s books and, in groups, they picked out the words that helped them visualize the poem and chose the senses that they used when they pictured the poem in their minds. This allowed me to meet FEAP 1D: “Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning” as well as FEAP 4B: “Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead to mastery.” My collaborating teacher, the reading content coach, and I all walked around the room to listen in on the conversations and provide the students with support.

Based on what I heard, I determined that the students were ready for more practice and split them into groups based on their reading levels using their guided reading groups as a guide. By doing this, I met FEAP 4A: “Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students’ learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process.” I used the data of running records and Developmental Reading Assessments (DRAs) as well as anecdotal notes and observations to inform my choice for the makeup of each group. I then decided that I would pull a small group of students to because I felt they needed the most support in the skill.

I chose poems that I believed the students of each group could read and then analyze using the skill. This allowed me to meet FEAP 2H: “Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students” as well as FEAP 3H: “Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students.” Instead of using one poem that met the needs of the core students, the reading content coach and I decided to split the class into groups. I chose the makeup of each group and the poems for these groups. I worked alongside one of the groups by reading the poem out loud to these students so the vocabulary would not limit them as they analyzed the poem. I was very surprised to see that after a few read alouds, the students were able to pick out specific words that allowed them to visualize the poem. It was slightly difficult for them to articulate their thoughts but I think this further proved that my support was necessary to help these students be successful when using this skill.

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(The poem above was taken from http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/songspoems.html)

 

I used the poem above when working with my small group. They were able to quickly tell me that the words “sizzle” and “pop” helped them hear the popcorn cooking. The students had some difficulty making the connection between sight and pouring the oil in the pot and putting in the popcorn; however, they were able to visualize this idea and pick out these words.

At the end of the lesson, we had a debrief where each group came up and shared their poem. I noticed that the students had some difficulty articulating their thoughts but I could tell based on the writing on their papers that they understood the concept. For example, on group circled the phrase “hot air” in the poem below but the group members needed some help to determine which sense they used [touch] to visualize it. The group also circled phrases like “light and tasty” as well as “swirling.”

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Another group read the following poem and circled all of the color words because they could see all of the colors.

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They also explained that they could taste the carrot and cherry pie as well as the other foods.

 

I believe that my students were able to pick up on the skill during my lesson. I hope that they will continue to use it in the future in order to help their comprehension of poetry as well as stories. Next week, I will be teaching a lesson that helps students pick out words that relate to feelings, which is the other part of that standard. By teaching this lesson, I will meet FEAP 1B: “Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge.” For content coaching next week, I will again teach shared reading. I will help my students again use the skill of visualization; however, for this lesson students will learn to use visualization to help draw inferences based on details in the text as well as illustrations. I believe that this poetry lesson helped give my students the necessary background knowledge for my shared reading lesson for next week.